When you hired a third party to assist with a construction project, you assumed that they’d follow the specifications and stick to the contract you had put together. They worked for a few weeks, and you decided to make a visit to the construction site to review what was done.

When you got there, you were shocked by what you saw. In your contract, you had been specific about the materials that were to be used and the quality of the materials that you expected. You were surprised to find that the subcontractor had completely ignored what you said, changing colors and materials to suit what they thought would “look better.”

At this point, you have both material and nonmaterial breaches of contract. The nonmaterial breaches involved the wrong paint colors being used despite using the right brand as well as the wrong landscaping design, though the plants and stonework were correct.

Material contracts happened when the stairs were no longer marble but instead simple concrete and the fountain in the courtyard was limestone instead of the marble required. They told you it would stand up better to wear and tear, but you were furious that no approval was sought.

When a subcontractor breaches a contract in so many ways, it’s more than enough to make you upset. It’s your right to hold them accountable for wasting time and money on the project. If a breach of contract did take place, then you may want to reach out to your attorney about pursing compensation from the other party or resolving the conflict in other ways. This project is important to you, and it should have been completed properly.